Uncategorized

Re: Beyond all birth control/contraception/family planning, fertility/in/ivf, HRT, OBOS info | Female Forum

http://www.femaleforum.com/forums/viewthread/8108/#58825

I’m back yet again with even more information/s and resource/s.

This time its all about Breast Cancer, Breast Implants, and Me: Making Decisions and Moving Forward – Our Bodies Ourselves, Caroline Moore (Guest Contributor).  At the same time this also applies to beyond both Ovarian and other GYN cancers as well.  Especially, my died from it a yr ago (wed., 4/26/16).

At 41 years old, I had just married the man of my dreams. With two young kids in tow, I was moving us forward into the beginning of our best life. My boys would have a father figure. I would have a partner, my soulmate, my love. Literally as I was packing up my apartment to move, I received the call that no one ever expects: “The biopsy is back. I’m so sorry. It’s breast cancer.”

The next few weeks and months were a whirlwind. My instincts told me not to get swept away in the strong current created by the doctors: “must have more scans!”; “must schedule surgery!”; “go go go!” It is not easy to fight the waves, but your life is at stake and you and your family will be dealing with your choices forever.

During my treatment and recovery, I was an active participant in all the decisions, and none were made lightly. I selected my breast and plastic surgeons and oncologist carefully and trusted them completely from the beginning. And still, when I considered any treatment or procedure, I did a copious amount of research on my own and had long detailed conversations with them about the benefits and the risks of all the options. I asked lots of questions, including my signature one: “What would you do if this was happening to you?” I dared to challenge the doctors and the status quo. I took notes, recorded my appointments, and took someone with me to take even more notes. And, I read and read and read. Here’s a list of the questions I asked and my thoughts about what I learned.

What kind of surgery do I need?

Due to what was believed to be “multi-centric tumors” in my left breast, there was never a question of whether or not I would have my left breast removed: it had to go. I was left with only two options for surgery: a single or double mastectomy. I chose a double mastectomy.

How soon do I need surgery?

It turns out that in many cases, doctors are comfortable waiting a month or two — despite the urgency with which they try to get you scheduled. This time was so important to me because I was able to use it to learn about my choices, read stories of people who forwent standard medical care, and formulate my own opinion of what my plan would be.

Will I do breast reconstruction?

Breast reconstruction involves using implants or autologous tissue (tissue from a woman’s own body) to rebuild the shape of a breast. I never considered not reconstructing my breasts. As I move further away from the events, I can now see this as a viable option. However, I am still grateful that my body looks – relatively – whole.

Is there any information that implants are safe?

Well, no, there is not. There are cherry-picked short-term studies that the implant makers use to point to their “safety.” There is, however, much information that: 1) implants last 7 to 10 years on average, and will then need to be replaced, 2) silicone filled implants can discreetly rupture so regular MRIs are advised, 3) for years, many, many people have complained their implants made them sick, and many who had them removed regained their health. This information led me to decide to avoid implants and use my own tissue to reconstruct my breasts.

Well, no, there is not. There are cherry-picked short-term studies that the implant makers use to point to their “safety.” There is, however, much information that: 1) implants last 7 to 10 years on average, and will then need to be replaced, 2) silicone filled implants can discreetly rupture so regular MRIs are advised, 3) for years, many, many people have complained their implants made them sick, and many who had them removed regained their health. This information led me to decide to avoid implants and use my own tissue to reconstruct my breasts.

Think thats it for now.

Thank you, again, in advance.

Yours truly,

Jessica A Bruno

Image Attachments BreastCancer-1-IN-8-WOMEN.png

Advertisements
Standard